Pacific Electric 1360 at Corona, 1937

Pacific Electric no. 1360 at Corona, October 23, 1937.

© 1937 by Phillips C. Kauke, Stan Kistler Collection

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Showing 10 comments
  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    The buildings to the right look like they might be citrus industry related. Was this a possible shipping point?

  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    Link to 1914 PE Ry. map of Corona with existing lines and property proposed to be purchased: https://www.raremaps.com/gallery/detail/33118df/Pacific_Electric_Railway_Lines_in_Corona_California/Pacific%20Electric%20Railway.html

  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    Map seems to have north incorrectly oriented toward west. The proposed purchase area is near the location of the Corona substation and stub (?) lines pointed toward the Santa Fe main. Grant Boulevard is a.k.a. Grand Boulevard. A station was located on the east side of 3rd Street bordered by Main Street along the southside….a stub-end house track was once present in front of the station, with the main line continuing southbound to just beyond Merrill Avenue where it turned west toward Santa Fe main (a proposed line to Yorba Linda was never built). [North of Corona and shy of “Porphyry”, PE Ry. and Santa Fe had an interchange on another branch….it would be interesting to know if this had anything to do with the clay deposit mining at Alberhill. Alberhill supplied clay for Pacific Clay Products (aka Pacific Pottery) and probably both the Wade Tile factory and Poxon Pottery (aka Furlong-Poxon Tile & Pottery) in Vernon. Maybe PE did some hauling related to these operations? Trainorders site had some discussion of the Santa Fe, but no mention of PE.]
    There is no mention of 1300 combine (converted cars) types serving this line, however, PE #1362 did serve as the San Bernardino franchise car around 1942. The Riverside-Arlington-Corona (?) line remained in freight service after abandonment of passenger operations, with dieselization in 1943. Arlington-Corona service was operated with a Birney after 07 July 1924. PE #1000 was taken to Corona Station in 1938 on a Railroad Boosters excursion.

  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    Corrected reading of above, “There is no mention of 1360…types…”. [Other 1300 numbered cars did operate in the Inland Empire.]

  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    Link to that Trainorders discussion of Elsinore branch (ATSF) connected to PE at Corona (OERM Perris mentioned): https://www.trainorders.com/discussion/read.php?1,171816

  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    Referenced in Model Railroader April 1958 pages 56-57 under “PE’s 1000-class interurbans” (plans, photos, article) to wit: “In 1933 cars 1028, 1029, 1043 and 1044 were rebuilt into combines (see drawing) 1360-1363. Cars 1361-1363 had three of the original open-section windows closed up to form the baggage compartment, car 1360 had four windows closed up. In 1943 three of the combines—–Nos. 1360, 1362 and 1363—–were rebuilt back into all-passenger cars. No. 1361 was scrapped before this reconversion because of damage suffered in a collision. It was the first 1000-class car to be retired.” For full article see MR Volume 25 Number 4.

  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    State mineral report for 1918 shows Harrington pit was once used to supply (the pottery at) Tropico, via Corona. Since Santa Fe had no lines to Tropico or Glendale, it was seem likely that the PE-SP lines might have played a major role in delivering materials to the plant.

  • Al Donnelly
    Reply

    State mineral report for 1918 shows Harrington pit was once used to supply (the pottery at) Tropico, via Corona. Since Santa Fe had no lines to Tropico or Glendale, it was seem likely that the PE-SP lines might have played a major role in delivering materials to the plant. Found here: https://books.google.com/books?id=00A0AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA76&lpg=RA1-PA76&dq=furlong+poxon+tile+company&source=bl&ots=JrNsPhu4r-&sig=ACfU3U2CxG1rp67d589Pog3H7kzXj5wR4g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj4w4jI9ejkAhWBsZ4KHX1_CdUQ6AEwAXoECAgQAQ#v=onepage&q=furlong%20poxon%20tile%20company&f=false

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