Michael Patris Collection

5181 at Universal City

Posted on: May 10, 2017 by Pacific Electric No Comments

 

Fred V. DuBritz Photo, Michael Patris Collection

A very austere Universal City stop is seen in this October 11, 1952 shot. This stop was located at the Lankershim Boulevard overpass near the world-famous studio and has since been absorbed into the US 101 Hollywood Freeway.

Fred V. DuBritz Photo, Steve Crise Collection

1299 on a Fan Trip

Posted on: May 10, 2017 by Pacific Electric No Comments

 

Fred V. DuBritz Photo, Michael Patris Collection

Looking north on Van Nuys Boulevard from Gault Street, PE 1299, their official business car, is preforming duty on what appears to be a fan trip. This Fred V. DuBritz photo was taken on May 3rd 1952. Note the incorrect destination roller sign reading “San Bernardino”. Displaying incorrect destination signs was a favorite trick of railfans to confuse unsuspecting travelers.

Fred V. DuBritz Photo, Michael Patris Collection

 

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

From the brochure:

The Lines of this Company form a far more important railway system than can be judged from the number of trains arriving at and leaving Los Angeles each day. From a single track line of 18 miles in 1896 the Los Angeles-Pacific Railroad has grown to a double track system with a total of 185 miles of electric road, of which about ten miles are in Los Angeles.

Connections are made at Los Angeles with railroads diverging; at Sawtelle with Southern Pacific Company, at Inglewood with Santa Fe Railroad, at Hollywood with daily stage for Tolucca (sic), and at Redondo with Los Angeles & Redondo Railway, and with steamers for San Francisco and Coast points.

In addition to numerous intermediate points, the Company's service reaches Hollywood, Colegrove, Sherman, Sawtelle, National Soldiers' Home, Santa Monica, Ocean Park, Venice, Playa del Rey, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa and Redondo.

Nowhere are the elements conducive to expansion more pronounced. But the far-sighted management has not been slow in taking advantage of every point of strategic importance; so that any hope of successful competition in their territory must meet with failure.

Special Round Trip Tickets, taking in all these points, good for 10 days, and good to stop off at any or all of them, 80 cents.

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Los Angeles & Pacific to Santa Monica Tickets

Posted on: May 19, 2016 by Pacific Electric No Comments

 

LA&P ticket stub Santa Monica

The Los Angeles Pacific Railroad was both a steam locomotive railway as well as an electric railway. It began in 1899 when "General" Moses Sherman and Eli P. Clark filed articles of incorporation. Clark would serve as president and a facsimile of his signature is on the top ticket. On June 16, 1903, the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad merged with the Los Angeles-Santa Monica Railroad Company and the Los Angeles, Hermosa Beach and Redondo Railway Company. The new name after this merger was the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad of California, but everyone still just called it the Los Angeles Pacific Railroad. The Los Angeles-Santa Monica Railroad Company was incorporated on December 2, 1902.

Over time there would be nearly 200 miles of track from the beach communities of the South Bay, including Redondo, Hermosa, Manhattan, El Segundo, Playa del Rey and Santa Monica. The lines headed eastward from the beach through the west side of Los Angeles, downtown Los Angeles, Sawtelle (The Soldier's Home) and even through to Pasadena.

Rolling stock, in the heyday of 1906, included more than 400 pieces broken down as follows: 221 freight cars, 144 passenger cars, 17 electric locomotives, 12 repair service cars, 6 parlor cars and 5 mail cars.

From Terry Salmans: According to Interurbans Special 63 "Trolleys to the Surf" by Myers and Swett, LAP was sold to the Southern Pacific Railroad in 1906. The Los Angeles Pacific would be merged into the Pacific Electric in 1911.

By 1911 the PE could discontinue use of the steam locomotive lines, but continue to haul freight for decades.

Top ticket undated, blank on reverse. Bottom ticket back-dated 1908.

Michael Patris Collection

Sierra Madre Shuttle

Posted on: July 17, 2013 by Pacific Electric 2 Comments

 

Harold Stewart Photo, Craig Rasmussen Collection

Harold Stewart Photo, Craig Rasmussen Collection

Former Pacific Electric and Southern Pacific Railroad employee Harold Stewart captured this image of Pacific Electric no. 113 heading into Pasadena from Sierra Madre on October 1, 1940. The banner on the side advertises the Flower Show in Pasadena and the river-rock constructed home in the background still survives today at the northeast corner of Del Rey and Sierra Madre Boulevard, in the old East Pasadena neighborhood of Lamanda Park.

Harold Stewart Photo, Craig Rasmussen Collection

And today...

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Pacific Electric Waiting Room, Fair Oaks and Colorado, 1903

Posted on: July 5, 2013 by Pacific Electric No Comments

 

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

The intersection of Fair Oaks and Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, looking at the southwest corner and the Pacific Electric Railway ticket office and passenger waiting room in 1903. The PE car is heading south on Fair Oaks as a parade or procession of some sort heads east on Colorado.While there are a few horse drawn carriages in the image, there are no automobiles. Upstairs from the PE office is the law firm of A. R. Metcalfe. Today the first floor is the home of the Cheesecake Factory. 4.5" by 6.5" print, photographer unknown.

Michael Patris Collection

Here is the same location today:


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Pacific Electric Mount Lowe Timetable (1902)

Posted on: June 18, 2013 by Pacific Electric No Comments

 

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

The Pacific Electric Railway, after making the purchase of the Mount Lowe line, wasted no time in incorporating it into special advertising and timetables. This timetable dates from September 1902 and depicts the triangular PE - Mount Lowe logo, with the vista points Valley, Sea Shore and Mount Lowe named within the logo. Whereas Lowe called his railway, "Earth's Grandest Mountain Ride" the PE continued in the same way by calling it, "Grandest Scenic Trip on Earth." Six double sided panels share the scenic points and cities, including East Los Angeles, Highland Park, Garvanza, South Pasadena, Pasadena and Altadena and "Up and into the Beautiful Sierra Madre Mountains." Offices for ticket information were at 250 S. Spring Street (Stimson block) in Los Angeles and the Pacific Electric Railway Pasadena Office on the SW corner of Colorado and Fair Oaks. Round trip from LA to Alpine Tavern and back was $2.50; trains ran from as early as 8:00 am until 10:00 pm. Also mentioned is the newly constructed "Casino" which was not a gambling establishment, but a dance hall (50' by 100') which was also equipped with a bowling alley and fine croquet grounds.

Michael Patris Collection

Zane Grey and the Pacific Electric

Posted on: June 18, 2013 by Pacific Electric No Comments

 

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

Prolific writer Zane Grey, resident, of among other places Avalon and Altadena, California, where he ultimately died of heart failure in 1939, was a passenger of the Pacific Electric Railway when he was in town. While Grey might have chartered private cars from the PE to move himself and his entourage about, as characterized by this letter from 1919, he nonetheless used the Big Red Cars for his transportation needs.

Writing from Avalon, California, September 3, 1919 he states:

Dear Mr. Stewart,

We'll be over on the boat that leaves here at 4 o'clock on Friday. They keep changing
the schedule, so you had better telephone the P.E. on Friday morning to see if the time
has been changed. Please meet us with two cars at San Pedro.
I suppose we'll be in about 6 P.M.

Yours truly,

Zane Grey

Michael Patris Collection

Pacific Electric Ticket Book – Dolgeville (1908)

Posted on: June 18, 2013 by Pacific Electric 1 Comment

 

Michael Patris Collection

Michael Patris Collection

The Pacific Electric Railway had special ticket books for frequent passengers. Some were for business folks, some for students and some for entire families, such as this one which allowed passengers to ride between downtown (6th and Main) to Dolgeville, which we all know today as Alhambra. Alfred Dolge set up the Standard Felt Factory after coming to California at the insistence of acquaintance Henry Huntington. Dolgeville was annexed to the city of Alhambra in 1908, the time frame of this ticket book. Tickets from this book were good in either direction.

Michael Patris Collection

Lake and Colorado inbound via Oak Knoll

Posted on: March 22, 2013 by Pacific Electric 2 Comments

 

Andy Payne Photo, Michael Patris Collection

Andy Payne Photo, Michael Patris Collection

Looking northeast from Lake Avenue just south of Colorado Boulevard, car 1135 leads a two car train to downtown Los Angeles via the Oak Knoll line. The building on the right stands on the southeast corner of Lake and Colorado and is the Security First National Bank, later to become Security Pacific National Bank, then, after several years, a building tear-down and a few remodels, now Bank of America. Undated.

Andy Payne Photo, Michael Patris Collection