Mud

Jack Finn Collection

Jack Finn Collection

A Pasadena-bound streetcar no. 202 on the Pacific Electric predecessor line Los Angeles and Pasadena Railway stops to pick up a passenger along a muddy route that has a nearby flivver bouncing through the ruts.

Jack Finn Collection

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Showing 7 comments
  • Donald Duke
    Reply

    This is a Pasadena car on the old Los Angeles and Pasadena Railway. It will cross the Los Angeles & Salt Lake tracks. This image dates from about 1906. This is a great site. This should have been done years ago. Keep up the great job! Duke

  • Steve Crise
    Reply

    Don, Thanks for showing me where this site is. The trolley is heading south from Pasadena to Los Angeles and is turning south on to Figuoria Street in Garvanza Park, south of the intersection of Figuoria and York. I think the name of the street that the car is on is Marmion Way. You can still sort of see how this was all laid out at this intersection even after 100 years has passed by.

  • WALT!
    Reply

    Yes, Figueroa Street and Marmion Way in Highland Park. In the background is the Garvanza Hotel. On the right side of the frame may have been the USC School of Fine Arts at Judson Studios.

  • David Moser
    Reply

    On the right side of the photo, you can see an early “Railroad Crossing” sign, before it became the universal crossbuck design we are all so familiar with today.

  • George Todd
    Reply

    I think the “Railroad Crossing” sign refers to the crossing of the LA&SL by the LA&P? We can’t read the letters on the vertical post.

  • Randall Bramstedt
    Reply

    Yes, this is a view of an automobile travelling down Marmion Way. York Ave can be seen on the far left side of the photo. The LA&SL crosses the PE just in front of the trolley pictured here. The LA&SL uses the York Ave. bridge to cross the arroyo. However, the LA&P uses a different bridge
    to cross the arroyo. As of 2011, the cut in the side of the hill along the LA&P double track right of way is still visible. I investigated this site 10 years ago. See the following link regarding the tracks at this site:

    http://harrymarnell.net/3bridges.htm

  • Randall Bramstedt
    Reply

    I now believe the PE right of way pictured here and the wooden bridge crossing the arroyo (out of view in the background) was the original California Southern Railroad right of way dating back to 1889. The California Southern was a subsidiary of the Santa Fe. In 1895, the Santa Fe replaced the pictured right of way with a different realignment path that included a steel trestle bridge (now part of the Gold Line) that still stands today to the south. Once that realignmet was completed, this original right of way must have been acquired for electric trolleys and eventually was used by the LA&P and ultimately the PE as shown here.

    Please correct me if I am wrong.

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